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In Honor of
David Moses Bridges
Strong Passamaquoddy Warrior, Artist,
Gentle Soul, Environmental Hero, and Friend

David Moses Bridges

David Moses Bridges with his mother, Hilda Lewis, in 2005.





David Moses Bridges and his mother, Hilda Lewis, have been leaders in the Save Passamaquoddy Bay 3-Nation Alliance work to keep Passamaquoddy Bay free of 3 LNG terminals. From Day 1 of this work, which started in 2004, until total victory in autumn 2016, David has been a warrior in this cause, and a valued member of Nulankeyutomonen Nkihtahkomikumon (We Take Care of the Land), the Sipayik affiliate of the Save Passamaquoddy Bay 3-Nation Alliance.

Save Passamaquoddy Bay From LNG button



David’s artistic and revered birch bark art has appeared on Save Passamaquoddy Bay tee-shirts, buttons, and posters since 2005. David crafted a traditional Passamaquoddy canoe as a major fundraiser for Save Passamaquoddy Bay 3-Nation Alliance that brought thousands of dollars to support the legal work of protecting Passamaquoddy Bay.

David Moses Bridges


Working with the Vermont Law School's, Environmental Law Clinic, David and Vera Francis led the legal effort to defeat LNG development at Sipayik's Split Rock sacred site. This victory resulted in a legal precedent, establishing standing for tribal and aboriginal individuals to challenge the federal government in court. This achievement was spotlighted at a weeklong international environmental conference at the United Nations in New York, where David was the major presenter for Save Passamaquoddy Bay 3 Nation Alliance, and especially for Nulankeyutomonen Nkihtahkomikumon’s leadership on the part of tribal and aboriginal people worldwide.

United Nations
Permanent Forum on
Indigenous Issues

2008 April 21 – May 2

David Moses Bridges participated in the 7th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. The invitation to participate was due to his work with Nulankeyutomonen Nkihtahkomikumon ("We Take Care of the Land," a member of the Save Passamaquoddy Bay 3-Nation Alliance and of the Indigenous Environmental Network). The effort opposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) development in Passamaquoddy Bay, three industrial proposals that ultimately were dismissed from federal permitting.

Nulankeyutomonen Nkihtahkomikumon's work resulted in federal courts recognizing individual tribal members' standing to sue the federal government for violating native rights — a legal precedent.

David highlighted issues of human rights, ecological integrity, and sacred sites, requesting worldwide unity on preserving and protecting Native lands and waters from environmental threats.

David was, and is, a special soul in our midst — a strong yet gentle warrior, honorable son, loving husband, inspiring father, keeper of tribal traditions, honor to his ancestors, the earth's champion, and a blessing to all who shared this planet and place with him.

We will always hear him in the rustling forest, see him paddling on precious Passamaquoddy Bay, and remember his ways and words.

We will forever protect what he loved so deeply.

—David's friends at Save Passamaquoddy Bay 3-Nation Alliance

David paddling a canoe in Western Passage

Additional websites honoring David Moses Bridges

The DMB Fund — Facebook

David Moses Bridges: An Artist and Activist WalksOn — Indian Country Media Network, 2017 Jan 20

David Moses Bridges: Obituary — Portland Press Herald, 2017 Jan 23

Cancer claims life of renowned Passamaquoddy birch bark canoe maker — Bangor Daily News, 2017 Jan 23